©2019 Caroline Hatton

About her

Caroline (rhymes with lean) was born in Normandy to Vietnamese immigrants and raised in Paris. Since her parents weren't made of French francs, she could never buy enough books, so she borrowed them from her school library. At age ten, having read all the library books an average of 2.7 times each, she began to write novels of her own in French. They were pretty terrible, so it's a good thing no French writing of hers survived, except for a poem about a cockroach.

By age sixteen, all this reading had led to a passion for science, so she took a detour from fiction writing to become a scientist. After earning a pharmacist degree from the University of Paris and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from UCLA, she became the Associate Director of the UCLA Olympic Laboratory, helping Dr. Don Catlin and his team test athletes for performance-enhancing drugs. Yet she never lost sight of her desire to write, so at age 39, she rearranged her life to fulfill it.

Caroline's first, humorous, multicultural novel, Véro and Philippe, made the Los Angeles Times Children's Bestsellers list. The book is about sibling rivalry turning to teamwork between Vietnamese-French kids growing up in Paris.

Her publications also include stories in Cricket magazine, craft activities in Highlights magazine, the Emergent Readers, Where Is My Puppy?, Surprise Moon, and A Pet For Grandma, and The Night Olympic Team, a science adventure of Olympic proportions. Her newest book, C'est pas marrant, is in French. When Caroline is not writing, she translates science writings between French and English, visits schools to inspire children to enjoy the power of words, and helps teach Therapeutic Riding to riders with special needs.

Interviews

Sharing the story behind

Véro and Philippe
during the publication party
at Dutton’s Brentwood Books

Caroline's desk

Conducting a sample identification test by comparing The Night Olympic Team's lead scientist Don Catlin with his photo in the book, during the publication party at the LA84 Foundation (the legacy of the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles)

Readers

Caroline (the one in red) hard at work doing research for her writing